The average Brit spends more than 20 hours a week feeling tired

A study carried out by the vitamin and supplement provider, Healthspan (https://www.healthspan.co.uk/) has revealed that the average adult Brit spends nearly three hours every day feeling drained and low on energy.

This means that we spend more than 20 hours per week and more than seven-and-a-half years of our life feeling tired according to the research. This amounts to almost four days of every month or six weeks per year in which we feel fatigued.

43% of respondents said that theyshutterstock_773009806’ve even had days where they’ve felt tired from the moment they’ve woken up to the moment they’ve gone to bed.

When questioned about what’s causing such feelings of exhaustion, 54% said that sleepless nights are to blame. A third said that early morning starts make them feel tired and another third blamed the winter’s dark mornings and early evenings.

Confirming that winter does in fact play a big role in our energy levels, medical nutritionist for Healthspan, Dr Sarah Brewer commented:

“It’s not widely known that a lack of vitamin D is associated with fatigue and exhaustion. A lack of it may contribute to the energy slump that many people experience towards the end of winter when our vitamin D levels are at their lowest. Correcting a vitamin D deficiency can significantly improve fatigue in otherwise healthy people.”

Yo-yo dieting, bad weather, long working hours and a poor diet are also known to contribute towards feelings or tiredness. Unsurprisingly, Monday was found tshutterstock_136830527o be the day of the week we feel the lowest on energy, followed by a mid-week slump on Wednesdays.

How to combat fatigue  

 A separate study carried out by http://www.onepoll.com/ revealed some particularly worrying findings about just how much of an impact fatigue is having on our lives. More than half of the survey’s respondents said that they struggle so much with tiredness that they often spend their whole weekend recovering from the working week rather than going out socialising.

It also found that 18% of us have used up a day of annual leave just because we were too tired to carry on and 14% have called in sick so we can catch up on some much-needed sleep. A whopping 58% of us have cancelled nights out with friends and 30% have skipped plans to exercise.

With so many of us struggling to maintain our energy levels, how can we combat fatigue once and for all?

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  • Drink plenty of water – if your body is dehydrated, it will function far less efficiently
  • Limit your caffeine intake – as tempting as it is to reach for the coffee when you’re low on energy, drinking too much caffeine during the day will make it harder for you to fall asleep at night. Too much caffeine can also make you feel anxious, irritable and negatively affect your performance
  • Don’t skip meals – food boosts our metabolism and gives the body energy to burn. Going too long without it causes our blood sugar levels to drop which means that we can’t maintain our energy levels throughout the day. Don’t crash diet either – low calorie diets don’t contain enough energy for the body’s needs and you will also be depriving yourself of essential vitamins and minerals
  • Natural supplements – Herbalists such as Baldwins (https://www.baldwins.co.uk/) have lots of natural products which can help. Siberian Ginseng for example is an energy-boosting wonder-food and you don’t have to worry about putting unnecessary chemicals into your body
  • Eat iron-rich foods such as lean red meat and leafy greens because iron-deficiency anaemia is a common cause of extreme fatigue